Phytoplankton bloom in the barents sea – Giclee fine art print

Nasa picture acquired august 31, 2010. In this natural-color picture from August 31, 2010, the ocean’s canvas swirls with turquoise, teal, navy, & green, the abstract art of the natural world. The colors were painted by a giant phytoplankton bloom made

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Phytoplankton bloom in the barents sea – Giclee fine art print

Nasa picture acquired august 31, 2010. In this natural-color picture from August 31, 2010, the ocean’s canvas swirls with turquoise, teal, navy, & green, the abstract art of the natural world. The colors were painted by a giant phytoplankton bloom made up of millions of tiny, light-reflecting organisms growing in the sunlit surface waters of the Barents Sea. Such blooms peak every August in the Barents Sea.The Barents Sea is a shallow sea sandwiched between the shoreline of northern Russia & Scandinavia & the islands of Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, & Novaya Zemlya. Within the shallow basin, currents carrying warm, salty water from the Atlantic collide with currents carrying chilled, fresher water from the Arctic. In the work of the winter, strong winds drive the currents & mix the waters. When wintery sea ice retreats & light returns in the spring, diatoms prosper, usually peaking in a immense bloom in late May.The variations in color are caused by different species & concentrations of phytoplankton. The bright blue colors are probably from coccolithophores, a kind of phytoplankton that is coated in a chalky shell that reflects light, turning the ocean a milky turquoise. Coccolithophores dominate the Barents Sea in August. Shades of green are likely from diatoms, another type of phytoplankton. Diatoms usually dominate the Barents Sea earlier in the year, giving way to coccolithophores in the late summer. However, field measurements of earlier August blooms have also turned up high concentrations of diatoms.The shift between diatoms & coccolithophores occurs as the Barents Sea changes in the work of the summer months. Throughout summer, perpetual light falls on the waters, gradually warming the surface. Finally, the ocean stratifies in to layers, with warm water sitting on top of cooler water. The diatoms deplete most of the nutrients in the surface waters & cease growing. Coccolithophores, on the other hand, do well in warm, nutrient-depleted water with plenty of light. In the Barents Sea, these conditions are strongest in August.The shifting conditions & corresponding modify in species lead to strikingly stunning multicolored blooms such as this. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this picture.NASA picture courtesy Norman Kuring, NASA Ocean Color Group. Caption by Holli Riebeek.Tool: Aqua – MODIS Photography by NASA Goddard Photo and Video & printed as a giclee art print by WHoArtNow in the UK.

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Weight 2 kg
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